Dr. Ron Paul: Just a Daydreamer or the Only Workable Alternative?

Monday, May 26 2008 @ 11:21 AM JST

Contributed by: Y.Yamamoto

When I was doing my daily mining routine on YouTube late last week, I came across some videos relating to Ron Paul. Actually there are 124,000 videos posted by his campaign office and supporters. and some of them have been viewed more than a million times. Until then, I hadn't known that the congressman, R-Tex, still remains in the presidential race, because of the media blackout in and outside the U.S.



From this Japanese blogger's point of view, the only candidate who could make a difference is one who will pull the plug on the dead organization called the United Nations and give Japan the 1-year prior notice to terminate the incongruous pact called the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security between the United States and Japan, as soon as s/he takes office. In the light of these criteria, either Obama, Clinton or McCain is out of the question. But since I came to know the obstetrician-turned-politician has persevered in the 2008 race on the "Libertarian" ticket, I have started thinking that for the American voters, hopes for real change may not have been thoroughly extinguished.

Admittedly, I am skeptical about the wisdom of categorically ruling out military or non-military intervention. No matter whether President Paul would opt to withdraw from WTO, his Secretaries of Commerce and Treasury Departments would have difficulty handling protectionist measures, including currency manipulation, China and some other country would certainly step up. His Secretary of Defense would face equally formidable problems, at home with defense contractors, and abroad with those nations whose Founding Fathers were, unlike their American counterparts, interventionists or even expansionists. Despite all these sticking points, I am inclined to buy into Ron Paul's philosophy because at any rate it precludes him from making America police the whole world with its overstretched troops deployed in 130 countries, let alone with the help of unreliable and overdependent allies such as Japan.

This afternoon, Amazon delivered my rush order for The Revolution: A Manifesto authored by the insightful septuagenarian. According to this book, Paul's team could raise $4 million online on the single day of November 5, 2007, and the record in the U.S. elections history was surpassed on December 16 when they could raise more than $6 million. This really indicates Ron Paul and his colleagues are now gathering momentum for a real change. I have a hunch that at latest by the time he, as well as myself, turns 85 in 2020, the American voters will send the real change agent to the White House. It's hard, sort of, to visualize what it will be like under the Libertarian administration, because we are too used to the false dichotomy between the Republicans and the Democrats. But if you assume that Ron Paul will most probably opt to put in place an Internet-enabled model of E-Democracy, you can somehow envisage what his minimalist government would look like.

The Japanese are funny species in that they are unable to internalize any sociopolitical issue. That's why the municipal government and the entire citizenry of Obama City, Fukui Prefecture, have now been enthusiastically rooting for Barack Obama. Against this backdrop, It's even more unimaginable how the Japanese would react to the profound and far-reaching implication of the real change the 85-year-old President of the United States would bring about in 2020. It's for sure, though, that the Japanese would be totally at a loss over how to go on without the nuclear umbrella and many other things that they have taken for granted in the last six decades.

As of today, the Japanese are still unable to become attuned to the ongoing "YouTube Revolution", although a growing number of them are signing on to the Internet community, rather aimlessly. But by the time an E-Government becomes a reality in the U.S. or some other countries in the West, they will belatedly realize that they are helplessly left behind and there is no way to catch up. A new nation will be born only after they go through the inevitable demise of what is now called Japan.

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