One Last Time on Conspiracy "Theories"

Sunday, May 27 2012 @ 07:23 PM JST

Contributed by: Y.Yamamoto

Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers.
- Voltaire

To tell the truth, I'm secretly in love with fringe "theories" because most of the time they are imaginative, entertaining and even thought-provoking. On the contrary, mainstream "theories" are just sickening, or boring at best.

"Fringe theory" is roughly synonymous with "conspiracy theory." But, is there any antonym for this phrase? It's really amazing to know that not a single conspiracy theorist in the U.S. understands the word conspiracy means absolutely nothing because there is no such thing that is NOT a conspiracy in this world.

Another semantic question that arises from this argument is how to refer to pundits and scholars who make their living by working on something which they don't think has anything to do with conspiracies. It seems as though the only possible way to call them is "mainstream pundits and scholars." But this is ridiculous because as a matter of fact, there are many conspiracy theorists in the mainstream, or even non-conspiracy theorists in the fringe.

If there is something that separates mainstreamers from fringers, it's the source of income. To me, a mainstream theorist is one who is getting paid by the media and political establishment whereas a fringe theorist is someone who is currently out of work and desperately seeking an alternative source of income, such as royalty from his book targeted at a gullible audience.

My estranged friend Benjamin Fulford is a Canadian journalist who has long settled down in Tokyo, capital of the nation where he can find millions and millions of suckers. It is true that he has been practically banned from Japan's mainstream TV networks in the last 7, 8 years because of his conspiracy theories. But nevertheless, he could make a fortune or two by publishing dozens of Japanese books targeted at the world's most credulous readers. He is a typical example of mainstream conspiracy theorists.

Actually, conspiracy theorists and non-conspiracy theorists are the two wings of the same bird. They share the same rotten body. Aside from the bird analogy, the single most important thing they have in common is the basic premise that they should seek the "truth" about the things which have been identified as issues by someone else. In the vast intellectual vacuum prevailing in their country, virtually all American people, from mainstream to fringe, from liberals to conservatives, from peaceniks to war-mongers, have been asking the same questions as to what exactly happened on September 11, 2001, who was behind the collapse of the WTC buildings and what his motive was.

The death toll from 9/11 was a mere 2,996, but when these unfortunate people were crushed under the rubble of the falling Towers, every American took it for granted that "the world would never be the same again."

Don't make me laugh.

67 years ago, Little Boy and Fat Man massacred 150,000-246,000 citizens of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and tons of incendiary bombs incinerated another millions who lived outside the sanctuary exclusively reserved for Emperor Hirohito. When the unprecedented tactic for something to be called a selective genocide was carried out, some of us said that our life would never be different till the end of time. Deep inside we felt the then "2,605-year-old" imperial reign had been frozen for permanent preservation. Our premonition has proved absolutely right.

You can't kill a dead man.

If the 9/11 incident should still be looked at from a conspiracy angle, the only conclusion that would make any sense is that the conspirator singlemindedly intended to give the finishing touches to the burst of the intellectual bubble in the U.S. With their brains irreparably damaged by the ultimate conspiracy, Americans have lost the minimum brainpower to understand that relevance varies from country to country, especially from America to the rest of the world. To them it's a no-no to question the universal relevance of the event beyond national boundaries.

Needless to say, the same process of idiotization is going on even more rapidly in Japan. When I wrote in this blog, for instance, that the loss of 20,000-plus Japanese lives in the "once-in-a-millennium" disaster was not a big deal when arithmetically compared to more than 30,000 people killing themselves every year, practically everyone pretended not to hear me. It is true that some gave me comments. But they were all Japanese epigones of conspiracy theorists in North America. They kept talking about a 3/11 plot hatched by Negev Nuclear Research Center in Demona, Israel, without being able to tell magnitude from intensity, let alone Mj from Mw, or JMA seismic intensity scale from other yardsticks used in other countries.

Aside from the issue with relevance, not a single conspiracy theorist has ever really substantiated his "theory" with solid evidence. Unlike mainstream idiots who swallow every official announcement at face value, conspiracy theorists are always looking around for plausible evidence supporting their heretical allegation. At the same time, they carefully weed out information that runs counter to it.

As computer-savvy people are well aware, it's a piece of cake these days to manipulate audio/visual materials leveraging state-of-the-art technologies to cook images and sounds as you like. But conspiracy theorists don't give a damn because to these guys with cultist mindset, the single most important thing is to BELIEVE in whatever fits well into their ideological delusion or delusive ideology. If the guru says the evidence is authentic and genuine, it's authentic and genuine. If the guru insists he didn't find any counter-evidence, there are none, for sure. The fact of the matter remains, though, you've got to be a fully-equipped and duly-authorized forensic expert to reveal a trick.

In the last 8 years since I started blogging, I have talked a lot about conspiracy theories. I think that's more than enough. I'm uploading this post, nonetheless, simply because I think one of the most important factors for the miscarriage of the Intellectual Revolution started by the former obstetrician is the fact that in the U.S., practically everyone, who has an inkling that something is fundamentally wrong with the status quo, is under the influence of conspiracy theorists, in one way or the other.

Actually the conspiracy theory is the farthest thing from Thomas Jefferson's principled way of thinking, or Voltaire's, for that matter.

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