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Mr. Onaga, this is no time for victory dancing *** 翁長雄志さん踊ってる場合じゃないんだよ

OUR GOAL IS TO MAKE YOU STOP TO THINK, AS WE ALWAYS PRACTICE HERE, RATHER THAN STOP THINKING. BEWARE NO ONE CAN DO THE THINKING ON YOUR BEHALF.


Okinawa Governor-elect Takeshi Onaga

Outgoing Okinawa Governor Hirokazu Nakaima




    As a dog returneth to
    his vomit, so a fool
    returneth to his folly.

               Psalm 26:11


In the middle of writing on the result of Okinawa's gubernatorial election of November 16, I realized it would take too much time if I intended to analyze its implication to the fullest. I decided to make it short because I still have some backlog issues such as Japan's religious salad and consequences of the protracted drought of disruptive technologies. Hopefully I will further elaborate on my take on the Okinawa election, if I have time after I can release these pieces from the pipeline,

People in even more uncivilized countries such as the United States always talk about election fraud in the face of the loss suffered by a candidate they support, or as a handy excuse for not bothering to cast their ballots so they can say, "It's not my fault," whenever things go wrong.

But in Japan vote-rigging is a rarity simply because it's unnecessary. It doesn't make a bit of difference who wins the poll.

In the last thirteen centuries since Shotoku Prince promulgated the 17-Article Constitution, the ruling classes have been increasingly well-equipped with the art of governing, while their subjects have developed for themselves an ingenious art of being governed. Not that people don't fear, complain, resist or protest. On the contrary, they express dissatisfaction nonstop with their constrained lives.

I think this is primarily attributable to the tradition of shamanism. Let's face it: Japan is, in fact, a mirage. True, it isn't a nothing; something is there. But certainly this country is a mere optical phenomenon without substance. It comes into real existence only when it's met with fear, resentment, or any other strong feeling from its people. By this hypothesis the pathology of its insatiable desire for international recognition, or even the nationwide addiction to Sumaho and other mobile devices, can be explained, as well, in an indisputable way.

Believe it or not, I'm not exaggerating or just analogizing, but this country is nothing but an illusion shared among 127 million people. Maybe the same is more or less true with some other nation-states. But it's their headache, not mine.

I know if you are one of those thinking-disabled people who "think" they are thinking while in fact they are just shuffling information purely on an ear-to-mouth basis, you will find my ontological inference about this nation-statehood not only crazy but also outrageous. That's too bad. But I'm not in a position to babysit a curtain-climber like you.

I've learned from my firsthand experience that the entire game being played here is rigged from the beginning through the Shintoist ritual. I first learned as a university student how the system works from the nationwide protest against the 1960 revision of the U.S.-Japan security treaty. And then I learned more in depth about the same mechanism as a key staff member at the Human Resource Management section of KYB, a manufacturer of shock absorbers and other hydraulic equipment, who was in charge of industrial relations at the height of the labor movements dominated by belligerent communists from the late-1950s through early-'60s.

Now I know for sure it's much more than just degassing dissidents. The perpetual antagonism among people, who are actually obsessed with the idea that harmony should always prevail, is what has shaped the very foundation of this country.

Looking at Takeshi Onaga, the winner of the Sunday election, dancing his victory dance at his campaign headquarters, I realized all anew that Okinawa which was annexed by this mirage-like country in the 1870s has been irreversibly assimilated into America's Japan. Now the two parts of the "nation-state" have conglutinated to each other in a way to form a monster that looks pretty much like inoperable Siamese twins.

Onaga's predecessor is Hirokazu Nakaima. In the last eight years, he did the following three things: 1) he won two elections on his anti-base campaign pledge, 2) he upped the ante for the budget allocation from the Tokyo government for the "development" of the prefecture, and 3) now he is leaving office as a governor who did his best for his voters despite the fact it's Nakaima himself who gave a green light for the landfill at Henoko, the new site for the base of the U.S. Marine Corps.

Since Nakaima has already made the relocation plan a fait accompli, it's almost irreversible now. If Onaga really meant to rescind Nakaima's approval as he promised to the voters, he has no time to dance to the same old tune. But actually, Onaga, as the incumbent Mayor of Naha City, had previously confided to his fellow mayors that "no matter how we protest against the policy of the Japanese government, it will never be overturned," according to a Wikipedia entry. He reportedly added: "Yet we have to uphold our anti-base position because that is the only way to get more budget allocations."

In fact in the last forty years the Tokyo government has allocated an aggregate 10 trillion yen of taxpayers' money to Okinawa to compensate for "the disproportionately heavy burden" on the 1.4 million islanders.

This is a deja vu of what I have experienced time and again with the Yamatonchu in the last six decades.

Without a doubt the Ryukyuans used to be a people with self-esteem and creative mind, like the Catalans are today, but not anymore, I'm afraid. ·

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Mr. Onaga, this is no time for victory dancing *** 翁長雄志さん踊ってる場合じゃないんだよ | 7 comments | Create New Account
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Mr. Onaga, this is no time for victory dancing 翁長雄志さん踊ってる場合じゃないよ
Authored by: Diogenes on Wednesday, November 19 2014 @ 05:46 PM JST
Since I don't know what these Okinawan politicians tell the masses expected to vote for them on the military base issue, I'd like to know if any of them have proposed some point-by-point plan on: a) forcing the abandonment of Okinawa as a U.S. perpetual occupation base, which would appear to require an end run around the central government in Japan; we all know that the Japanese government will never resist the grip of their American masters; b) how to live after the military bases have permanently closed, since, as I remember what happened in the Philippines when Subic Bay Naval Station and Clark Air Base closed—the country sank into a deep depression; millions of Filipinos left the country and sent money back from working abroad to help their destitute families. The presidents of the country used to call them patriots and heroes. If, as it is mentioned here, a military base closes, a certain number of primary and secondary jobs attached to that base(s) will be lost. This is an example on how these military bases inch their octopus arms out throughout an occupied country (even in the U.S. this is how the military/industrial/complex has done domestically what they do internationally).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Naval_Base_Subic_Bay

This quote is taken from the above link and shows how enmeshed the local population was tied to this foreign naval station.

The Vietnam War was the period of peak activity as Subic Bay became the U.S. Seventh Fleet forward base for repair and replenishment after the Gulf of Tonkin incident in 1964. The average number of ships visiting the base per month rose from 98 in 1964 to 215 by 1967. The base, with 6 wharves, 2 piers, and 160 mooring points and anchorages, had about 30 ships in port on any given day.[6][7] Alava pier was extended by 600 feet (183 m) in 1967. The record of 47 ships in port was set in October 1968. About one-third of these were Military Sea Transportation Service ships bringing 45,000 tons of food, ammunition, and supplies and 2 million barrels of fuel oil, aviation gasoline, and JP-4 jet fuel each month including fuels transferred to Clark Air Base via a 41-mile (66 km) pipeline. The Naval Supply Depot maintained an inventory of 200,000 parts. The 4,224,503 sailors visiting Subic Bay in 1967 purchased more than $25 million in duty-free goods from the Navy Exchange.[8]
More than $63 million of construction projects contracted between 1964 and 1968 did not prepare the Ship Repair Facility (SRF) for the increasing workload and emergency peaks generated by the war. American military and civilian population totaled about 4,300; and more than 15,000 Filipino SRF workers worked 12-hour shifts for an average of over 60 hours per week. The physical plant consisted of quonset huts put up after World War II; and workers used obsolete tools and equipment supplemented by machine tools made available by decommissioning the New York Navy Yard. Additional floating drydocks and a third repair ship were assigned from the United States to increase the capabilities of the repair facility.[8]
The fire-ravaged Forrestal was repaired in August 1967 before her return to the United States for a complete overhaul. Destroyers O'Brien, Ozbourn, Turner Joy and Edson, damaged by North Vietnamese shore batteries, were repaired, as were amphibious assault craft, river patrol boats and other small craft.[8]
The Royal Australian Navy destroyer Hobart was repaired at Subic following the attack by USAF aircraft on June 17, 1968.
On June 3, 1969 the Royal Australian Navy carrier HMAS Melbourne was involved in a collision with USS Frank E. Evans about 240 miles (390 km) southwest of Manila. The USS Kearsarge brought 196 of the 199 survivors to Subic Bay. A Joint Australian/U.S. Board of Inquiry convened on June 9 in the library of George Dewey High School, the same day the stern section of the Evans arrived under tow by a tug. It was stripped and towed to sea as a gunnery target.[9]
Harbor Clearance Unit One was activated at Subic Bay in 1966 with the mission of salvaging ships from the rivers and harbors of Vietnam. Two of the biggest jobs were the salvaging of the Baton Rouge Victory from the Saigon River and the raising of the 170-foot (52 m) dredge Jamaica Bay from the Mỹ Tho River. Both jobs were accomplished despite continuous harassment by enemy sniper fire.[9]
NAS Cubi Point served as the primary maintenance, repair and supply center for the 400 carrier based aircraft of the Seventh Fleet's carrier force. The jet engine shop turned out two jet engines a day to keep pace with the demands of the air war in Vietnam.[9]
Following the fall of Saigon in the summer of 1975 hundreds of thousands of refugees fled Vietnam. Thousands of these refugees were rescued at sea by U.S. Navy ships and taken to Subic Bay. A temporary processing center that handled thousands of refugees was set up on Grande Island in 1975. They were later taken to the Philippine Refugee Processing Center in Morong, Bataan. The Military Bases Agreement of 1947 was amended in 1979, changing the role of the Americans at Subic Bay from landlord to guest. The amendment confirmed Philippine sovereignty over the base and reduced the area set aside for U.S. use from 244 to 63 square kilometres. Philippine troops assumed responsibility for the perimeter security of the base to reduce incidents between U.S. military and Philippine civilians. The unhampered operation of U.S. forces was assured. The U.S. granted the Philippines $500 million in military sales credits and supporting assistance.

Then there's this quote on the base closures. (Note: Clark Air Base had to close due to a gigantic volcanic eruption before Subic Bay closed.)
The Vietnam War was the period of peak activity as Subic Bay became the U.S. Seventh Fleet forward base for repair and replenishment after the Gulf of Tonkin incident in 1964. The average number of ships visiting the base per month rose from 98 in 1964 to 215 by 1967. The base, with 6 wharves, 2 piers, and 160 mooring points and anchorages, had about 30 ships in port on any given day.[6][7] Alava pier was extended by 600 feet (183 m) in 1967. The record of 47 ships in port was set in October 1968. About one-third of these were Military Sea Transportation Service ships bringing 45,000 tons of food, ammunition, and supplies and 2 million barrels of fuel oil, aviation gasoline, and JP-4 jet fuel each month including fuels transferred to Clark Air Base via a 41-mile (66 km) pipeline. The Naval Supply Depot maintained an inventory of 200,000 parts. The 4,224,503 sailors visiting Subic Bay in 1967 purchased more than $25 million in duty-free goods from the Navy Exchange.[8]
More than $63 million of construction projects contracted between 1964 and 1968 did not prepare the Ship Repair Facility (SRF) for the increasing workload and emergency peaks generated by the war. American military and civilian population totaled about 4,300; and more than 15,000 Filipino SRF workers worked 12-hour shifts for an average of over 60 hours per week. The physical plant consisted of quonset huts put up after World War II; and workers used obsolete tools and equipment supplemented by machine tools made available by decommissioning the New York Navy Yard. Additional floating drydocks and a third repair ship were assigned from the United States to increase the capabilities of the repair facility.[8]
The fire-ravaged Forrestal was repaired in August 1967 before her return to the United States for a complete overhaul. Destroyers O'Brien, Ozbourn, Turner Joy and Edson, damaged by North Vietnamese shore batteries, were repaired, as were amphibious assault craft, river patrol boats and other small craft.[8]
The Royal Australian Navy destroyer Hobart was repaired at Subic following the attack by USAF aircraft on June 17, 1968.
On June 3, 1969 the Royal Australian Navy carrier HMAS Melbourne was involved in a collision with USS Frank E. Evans about 240 miles (390 km) southwest of Manila. The USS Kearsarge brought 196 of the 199 survivors to Subic Bay. A Joint Australian/U.S. Board of Inquiry convened on June 9 in the library of George Dewey High School, the same day the stern section of the Evans arrived under tow by a tug. It was stripped and towed to sea as a gunnery target.[9]
Harbor Clearance Unit One was activated at Subic Bay in 1966 with the mission of salvaging ships from the rivers and harbors of Vietnam. Two of the biggest jobs were the salvaging of the Baton Rouge Victory from the Saigon River and the raising of the 170-foot (52 m) dredge Jamaica Bay from the Mỹ Tho River. Both jobs were accomplished despite continuous harassment by enemy sniper fire.[9]
NAS Cubi Point served as the primary maintenance, repair and supply center for the 400 carrier based aircraft of the Seventh Fleet's carrier force. The jet engine shop turned out two jet engines a day to keep pace with the demands of the air war in Vietnam.[9]
Following the fall of Saigon in the summer of 1975 hundreds of thousands of refugees fled Vietnam. Thousands of these refugees were rescued at sea by U.S. Navy ships and taken to Subic Bay. A temporary processing center that handled thousands of refugees was set up on Grande Island in 1975. They were later taken to the Philippine Refugee Processing Center in Morong, Bataan. The Military Bases Agreement of 1947 was amended in 1979, changing the role of the Americans at Subic Bay from landlord to guest. The amendment confirmed Philippine sovereignty over the base and reduced the area set aside for U.S. use from 244 to 63 square kilometres. Philippine troops assumed responsibility for the perimeter security of the base to reduce incidents between U.S. military and Philippine civilians. The unhampered operation of U.S. forces was assured. The U.S. granted the Philippines $500 million in military sales credits and supporting assistance.
Closure of Subic Bay Naval base.
Many months before the expiration of the Military Bases Agreement of 1947 intense negotiations between the governments of the United States and the Philippines began. These negotiations resulted in the Treaty of Friendship, Peace and Cooperation between the United States and the Republic of the Philippines.[11] This would have extended the lease of the American bases in the Philippines. On September 13, 1991, the Philippine Senate rejected the ratification of this treaty.[12]
In December 1991, the two governments were again in talks to extend the withdrawal of American forces for three years but this broke down as the United States refused to detail their withdrawal plans or to answer if nuclear weapons were kept on base. Finally on December 27, President Corazon Aquino, who had previously fought to delay the U.S. pullout to cushion the country's battered economy, issued a formal notice for the U.S. to leave by the end of 1992.[13] Naval Station Subic Bay was the U.S.'s largest overseas defense facility after Clark Air Base was closed.
During 1992, tons of material including drydocks and equipment,[14] were shipped to various Naval Stations. Ship-repair and maintenance yards as well as supply depots were relocated to other Asian countries including Japan and Singapore. Finally, on November 24, 1992, the American Flag was lowered in Subic for the last time and the last 1,416 Sailors and Marines at Subic Bay Naval Base left by plane from Naval Air Station Cubi Point and by the USS Belleau Wood. This withdrawal marked the first time since the 16th century that no foreign military forces were present in the Philippines.

It's these kinds of discussion topics that, to me, would show how sincere a politician is about this subject. As we can see in this example, when the U.S. is forced to leave, they not only destroy the economy by a sudden explosion in unemployment, they also take all their toys and leave. This is what a real politician would have to plan to overcome, if he is sincere on freeing the islands of occupation. This might be an impossible thing to do. The people would have to steel themselves for a sharp degradation in income level, perhaps to the poverty or below levels.

Then there's the question of how truly sincere the Okinawan voters are. Are they simply voting for a feel-good election outcome and will be patient sheep, accepting all the excuses the governor gives, or will they make real demands? Since I'm not there and can't read their newspapers, I can't speak on how genuine they want this liberation to be. Most if not all have modern creature comforts: electricity, a stable food supply, probably a fairly comfortable life, a television to hypnotize them into an alpha state. How much of these modern conveniences are they willing to threaten? That's the great unknown, likely even to the individual Okinawan himself.
Mr. Onaga, this is no time for victory dancing 翁長雄志さん踊ってる場合じゃないよ
Authored by: Y.Yamamoto on Wednesday, November 19 2014 @ 07:46 PM JST


Obviously I should have explained more in detail what the candidates promised to the voters and what voters' take on their pledges was like, if I had had time to do so.

It's quite natural that you Americans don't understand three important points.

1. It's kinda very sweet and comfortable to be colonials. Every time things go wrong, all they should do is to put the blame on America. They are almost addicted to this situation.

2. Unlike in America there are no "sheeple" in this country. As I briefly explained, they always protest because only by doing so, they can bring what isn't there into existence. This is the very foundation of this country.

3. By the same token, Onaga or any other "politician" isn't actually a politician. How can he lead a nonexistent country? Only a shaman can give life to the illusion.

I'll come back when I wake up from the 3rd installment of my fragmented sleep.

Mr. Onaga, this is no time for victory dancing 翁長雄志さん踊ってる場合じゃないよ
Authored by: Y.Yamamoto on Thursday, November 20 2014 @ 07:24 AM JST


Now I've carefully studied your comment once again. I really appreciate it because you have once again educated me on these things.

On my part, I've added a couple of paragraphs to the post in response to your questions.

Now I hope you've understood Nakaima, Onaga, or any other politician for that matter, has never lied to anyone and that voters have never felt they were deceived. That means the Japanese, including the Okinawans, never lie to anyone but themselves.

You may still wonder how it is possible for the 127-million people to share one and the same illusion. Of course it's mediums, ranging from the mainstream media, to alternative media, to social media to publications, all of whom are honest, as well, that enable this to happen.

Mr. Onaga, this is no time for victory dancing *************************** 翁長雄志さん踊ってる場合じゃないよ
Authored by: samwidge on Saturday, November 22 2014 @ 09:28 AM JST

You have definitely succeeded here in your effort to make us, " STOP TO THINK... RATHER THAN STOP THINKING." You have created an intellectual playing field that makes us question our opinions and makes us want to learn more.

You are definitely neutral in that you send us in no particular direction. That may be nice but we would like your thoughts on what options exist. In my case, I feel a certain personal power to change things in those cases where I understand them. I get results. I am successful in that I got local government to quit using its labor crews as tools to denigrate a certain political faction.

You motivate me and I presume many others, to look for things that can and should be adjusted in the Okinawa/base issue. In my mind there is an unhappy balance of social wants versus the sheer terror of China's will to dominate by violence or by more subtle means.

If you wish readers like me to write articles and contact people who can make change, you must be more clear. Grand commands like "Yankee go home!" will not work. There is too much at risk for too many people of too many nations. Japan alone is too small. Each person who can reach above the common people must be cautious. It is like shooting a pistol; The shooter must understand that there will be a result and that the shooter's aim must be correct.

You say ethereal things like, "...the protracted drought of disruptive technologies." True but what are we going to do about it? Those few words say hundreds of thousands of things all at once and all are valid.

Few realize that today's rapid advancement of electronics in entertainment, medicine and space all fit within a narrow mindset of modern wants and needs. Nice but not enough. You have it right. Broader dimensions of technological inquiry are needed in physics, chemistry and travel. The concept of Social Control desperately needs a new view, a new definition. Inquiry is simply not happening. Perhaps your expression will alarm someone and open fresh inquiry if you express it well.

Your claim that, "country is nothing but an illusion shared among 127 million people" seems irrational hyperbole. You are running but your feet are not touching the ground. I am glad to read your thoughts but, in this, you seem caught up in irrational hyperbole.

You said, "... perpetual antagonism among people, who are actually obsessed with harmony." In this you are correct but this truism of humanity needs some hope that there is a way to change. How can we do it? What are the possibilities?

Shall we merely sit around and complain?

Mr. Onaga, this is no time for victory dancing *************************** 翁長雄志さん踊ってる場合じゃないよ
Authored by: Y.Yamamoto on Saturday, November 22 2014 @ 03:00 PM JST


As always your feedback is very interesting in many ways; it's thought-provoking but at the same time it's entertaining.

It's great to know I have "definitely succeeded here in your effort to make us, 'STOP TO THINK... RATHER THAN STOP THINKING.'" But I suspect you didn't stop long enough to think Exactly WHY I want you to stop to think in the first place. My words that immediately follow that sentence are meant to explain it: "BEWARE NO ONE CAN DO THE THINKING ON YOUR BEHALF."

This is the reason I never give my "thoughts on what options exist" for others. Fortunately I'm a modest East Asian who isn't arrogant enough to tell people what options are there before them and what pros and cons are involved in each option.

What I was expecting most from my audience when uploading this post is what YOU think YOUR options are.

If I'd dared to deviate from the above-mentioned principle, I would have said there are two simple options for Americans:

1. LEAVE OKINAWA IMMEDIATELY,
2. STAY THERE UNTIL THE OKINAWANS START BEHEADING MARINES.

Of course I would prefer Option 1 because as the late Chalmers Johnson described it, the Okinawans have an "800-pound gorilla in their living room."

But remember these are YOUR options, not ours. To me talking about someone else's options is no different from "merely sitting around and complaining."

As I wrote in my recent post dealing with John Locke, the real problem lies with the fact that you Americans don't understand that "to think does NOT mean to select the correct answer from among 'Yes,' 'No,' 'I don't know,' and 'I don't care.'"

And of course you didn't fail to use your favorite word in saying: my "claim that, 'country is nothing but an illusion shared among 127 million people' seems IRRATIONAL HYPERBOLE." And as usual you forgot to give me a single RATIONAL REASON why you "THINK" it's an irrational argument. Actually this is a deliberate statement based on my firsthand experience I've had in the last 60 years. AT LEAST you should be able to specify for me exactly what underlies the insatiable desire for international recognition or the nationwide addiction to adaptive, i.e. non-disruptive, technologies.

I must conclude you didn't stop long enough to think about these points.

Mr. Onaga, this is no time for victory dancing *************************** 翁長雄志さん踊ってる場合じゃないよ
Authored by: Y.Yamamoto on Saturday, November 22 2014 @ 05:18 PM JST


I came back to say something.

Initially I thought I just had to make believe it was a slip of the tongue when you said my deliberate statement about this country being a mere illusion shared by 127 million people was an "irrational hyperbole." But on second thought, I realized it was meant to be a downright insult to me, although you may not have noticed it yourself.

I, as a blogger and as a human being, I've always tried to expose myself to criticism from others. But a criticism is one thing and personal insult is quite another.

In the last 60 years or so, I've studied a wide range of disciplines from philosophy to economics to computer science. At the same time I've accumulated real-life experiences in various fields as I wrote in this post. And most recently, I've taken a hard thought at the independence movement in Catalonia and America's founding principles based on John Locke's empiricism. In the meantime I've been discussing offline the history of the "modern nation-state" and its future perspective with some local students majoring in the subject and a couple of assistant professors specializing in it. And I finally came to that conclusion.

Under the circumstances I do NOT want you to take back your comment that I'm just spreading an "irrational hyperbole." That would be too unmanly. Instead, I insist you give us a rational reason why you "think" my argument is an irrational hyperbole.

Words sometimes outweigh deeds. I can wait for a week or so, but as a human being with a certain amount of self-esteem, I can't take it anymore.

Mr. Onaga, this is no time for victory dancing *************************** 翁長雄志さん踊ってる場合じゃないよ
Authored by: Diogenes on Sunday, November 23 2014 @ 01:04 PM JST
There's the red pill that gives you such and such an experience, then there's the blue one, that gives you its experience, but Samwidge seems to have taken something else. I don't know what planet he's from, but either he's been asleep for decades like Rip Van Winkle or his HAL 3000 needs a reboot. Take this quote:

“You motivate me and I presume many others, to look for things that can and should be adjusted in the Okinawa/base issue. In my mind there is an unhappy balance of social wants versus the sheer terror of China's will to dominate by violence or by more subtle means.”

Who is dominating whom? Is China occupying Okinawa? Is China occupying Japan? Is China occupying Afghanistan? Is China occupying Germany? Has China attacked, invaded and occupied Iraq? Has China attacked, invaded, and occupied Kosovo, forcing it to be carved off from Serbia? Did China instigate all the so-called “color revolutions” around the world? And speaking of domination, why is every American state occupied with a large contingent of military bases? Are they there to protect the people, or are they there to see to it that the American people don't get a little too uppity and want to end the 1933 declaration of martial law enacted during the treasonous Roosevelt administration? And since the U.S. is still under this declaration of martial law, examine the Lieber Code to see just what that means. You, Samwidge, are the enemy. Your vague statement that you, “...feel a certain personal power to change things in those cases where I understand them. I get results. I am successful in that I got local government to quit using its labor crews as tools to denigrate a certain political faction.” What a laugh. My god, Rip, wake the hell up, laddie, and smell the coffee!

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/lieber.asp

Then there's this glossolalia-like statement:

“If you wish readers like me to write articles and contact people who can make change, you must be more clear. Grand commands like "Yankee go home!" will not work. There is too much at risk for too many people of too many nations. Japan alone is too small. Each person who can reach above the common people must be cautious. It is like shooting a pistol; The shooter must understand that there will be a result and that the shooter's aim must be correct.”

Clearly, you failed to read my posting about the military bases closing in the Philippines. The Senate in that country refused to renew the treaty and forced the U.S. to leave. They said “Yankee go home” in the loudest of words—through non-renewal of the treaty.

In fact, China as well as Russia are bending over backwards to avoid any military conflict. It's the U.S./NATO/Zionist alliance that is causing the chaos, mass murder, and invasions all across the planet.

You go on to make this irrational statement of your own:

“Your claim that, "country is nothing but an illusion shared among 127 million people" seems irrational hyperbole. You are running but your feet are not touching the ground. I am glad to read your thoughts but, in this, you seem caught up in irrational hyperbole.”

Have you looked in the mirror? Have you looked at the people around you, especially when they are watching television? Alpha state is what that's called. It's the same state of consciousness that hypnotists put people in. What, then, is the U.S. but a country of 310+ million souls imprisoned in a perpetual hypnotic state of a shared illusion. There's no escape. You are trapped, man, or is it computer? You are trapped and will NEVER escape. Perhaps you are really the real life character Jeff Bridges played in Tron, a guy that got too close to his computer and got trapped inside. If that's the case, you'd better hope that the sucker has a large UPS for the day that the inevitable power goes out.

I've typed too much as it is.